Ohio has purged 2 million voters from 2011 to 2016, more than any other state, including 1.2 million for infrequent voting. At least 144,000 voters in Ohio’s three largest counties, home to Cleveland, Columbus, and Cincinnati, were purged since the 2012 election, with voters in Democratic-leaning neighborhoods twice as likely to be removed as those in Republican-leaning ones, according to a Reuters analysis.

Traditional Northern and Midwestern swing states like Pennsylvania and Ohio are likely to lose electoral votes and congressional seats, while states like Texas and Arizona — which aren’t swing states now but are becoming more competitive — are likely to gain them. Florida, which is already among the swingiest swing states, will also likely gain seats. That means Trump’s strategy of appealing to Rust Belt voters could be less successful in future races.

The Brennan Center for Justice identifies fifteen states that have new voting restrictions in place for the first time for the 2016 presidential election, and five more that have had restrictions in place since the 2012 election. These include several states considered “battlegrounds” in the upcoming presidential election, or that have competitive elections for Senate seats, including Florida, Ohio, Wisconsin, Iowa, New Hampshire, Virginia, Illinois, and Arizona.

Through the late eighties and the early nineties, liberals on college campuses often spoke of “multiculturalism”: a reform of the curriculum to reflect the many traditions of the world. As the doctrine gained adherents, though, it was criticized by the academic left—not least, by many nonwhite scholars—who worried that it made a luxury commodity of otherness ... The kids in college now could be called the Firebrand Generation. They...aspire to tear down the web of deceptions from the inside.

In Southern states...county lines often double as school district lines, creating "less opportunity for intentional segregation." Instead, the researchers found the greatest disparity tended to occur in the country’s manufacturing centers: Michigan, Wisconsin, Indiana, Illinois, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. In the study, the term "segregation" is referring to class separation, not race. The two often overlap, however, creating what some allege is a legal way to essentially continue racial segregation

It’s a transformation that’s happened in a blink of an eye, turning a neighborhood that in 2009 topped Compton in Los Angeles for the “most dangerous” title into something that looks and feels like Greenwich Village. And it didn’t happen by accident. Virtually everything that’s occurred...from the placement of the trees in the park to the curation of ground floor businesses—has been meticulously planned and engineered by a single, corporate-funded and decidedly non-governmental entity.

....a wave of young, educated, relatively high-earning workers [are] flocking to many American cities at a rate not seen since the U.S. Census Bureau began tracking such data in the 1970s. The shift began last decade and accelerated during the housing bust

Mexican cartels have overtaken the U.S. heroin trade, imposing an almost corporate discipline ... They have broadened distribution beyond the old big-city heroin centers like Chicago or New York to target unlikely places such as Dayton. The midsize Midwestern city today is considered to be an epicenter of the heroin problem, with addicts buying and overdosing in unsettling droves ... They arrange deals by cellphone and deliver heroin like pizza ... almost invisible to law enforcement.

Like Colorado, Washington, D.C., is a center of extensive substance use ... ranking among the nation’s leaders for cocaine, alcohol and marijuana use ... As the most religious region of the country, the Southeast and Bible Belt have long tended to have lower consumption of intoxicating substances — particularly alcohol — than the rest of the country. Yet non-medical painkiller use is an exception to this general rule, with most of its top consumers being in or near this region

The FDA eased access to Mifeprex by updating the prescribing information on the drug's label...expanding use to 70 days of gestation from the current 49 days, cutting the recommended dose of the drug and reducing the number of required visits to a doctor. In practice, many abortion providers had moved away from the previous restrictions over the years but...Texas, North Dakota and Ohio have laws that restrict medication abortions by requiring prescription...strictly according to the old label